Tips for Reluctant Readers

Many parents desire for their children to be avid readers and to love reading. In some cases, this love of reading comes naturally and effortlessly. For others, reading can be a struggle and the process can be laborious. When students have a difficult time with the learning-to-read process, the activity itself becomes unenjoyable and students quickly lose interest. Unfortunately, without the interest to want to read, students do not improve their reading skills. 
Therefore, how can we encourage and motivate our reluctant readers? Here are a few tips on how to help those reluctant readers.
 
1. Connect with the student’s interests. Students are more likely to pick a book in which they are interested. Books can cover hobbies such as fishing, car racing, ice skating, etc. or can be informational texts covering intriguing science topics. Choosing a topic that is new may also spark students’ interest.
2. Use technology to your advantage. With technology making a significant impact on students’ learning, parents can use eBooks and download them on a mobile device. Many eBooks allow students to hear the story read to them while the words are simultaneously highlighted on the screen. These books can be simple picture books or even a full length chapter book.
3. Show students how reading can affect other subjects such as reading a math problem, conducting a science experiment by adding ingredients together, or following directions on a map.
4. Make reading a shared activity at home. Shared reading allows the parent and child not only to spend time together, but to engage in meaningful discussion about the book. The parent and child can take turns reading pages or read silently together, stopping occasionally to discuss what is being read. This allows the parent to model reading and to make it a fun activity that both can enjoy.
5. Introduce students to a book series. Explain that reading a series of books can be like watching a TV show series. Also, some book series have been developed into movies. If students have seen the movie, it may pique their interest to pick up the book version.
 
Here are some examples of popular children’s books that have turned into movies: